Supervised by Phillip J. Bowman, M.D., M.P.H. A73152

Clinical Orientation

  • Existential
  • Gestalt
  • Client-Centered Humanistic

Goals

  • Improve awareness of one’s self, environment and relationship with others
  • Develop acceptance of all aspects of one’s identity
  • Remove obstacles that interfere with one’s ability to realize their full potential
  • Develop tools to manage symptoms of depression and anxiety

Education and Background

  • 5 years practicing Psychology
  • Marriage and Family Therapist Intern registered with the Board of Behavioral Sciences
  • MA in Clinical Psychology with an Emphasis in Marriage and Family Therapy from Pepperdine University
  • BA in Sociology and Psychology from University of California, Irvine

Work Experience & Specialization

Provides psychotherapy to Individuals, Couples and Families, specializing in:

  • Millennials (ages 18-34)
  • Relationships Issues
  • Career Dissatisfaction/ Underperformance
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Substance Abuse
  • Adult ADHD
  • Expressive Arts Therapies
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Therapy (TMS)

Practice Updates

  • Obtaining certification in the practice of Gestalt and Experiential Therapy

More about Mikah Maly-Karros

Mikah Karros Is a board registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern, with a diverse personal and clinical background. With experience working in private practice, residential treatment and educational settings, she has provided services for children, adolescents and adults struggling with a variety of clinical issues. Mikah specializes in treatment of depression, anxiety, substance abuse, adult ADHD, relationship issues and underperformance. Additionally, Mikah has developed a specialized practice working with millennial clients, addressing issues specific to individuals within the 18-34 year age group.

Mikah offers a holistic approach to therapy, integrating wellness of the mind, body and spirit. For Mikah, Therapy is an art, requiring creativity, vulnerability and an open mind. She believes that inspiration is often found in pain. The goal of therapy is learning to use one’s pain to create something beautiful.


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